Seed Preservation - Open Pollinated - Non GMO - Heirloom - Untreated



October 19, 2021


Farm update: CSA and Market veggies are cancelled.......until the cows come home.

Due to being left hanging to dry, LITERALLY, we will no longer be offering CSA shares or market veggies.

We have no water to operate successfully. I know, weird right? True story. Who knew? We live in Canada, eh! Where water is abundant. Well not everywhere. So there ya go. You learn something new every day. A heads up, don’t wrack your brain trying to figure it out – even an experienced farmer with agriculture schooling and years' experience running a CSA operation nor an engineer could crack the code. What's that? dig a pond? yes, thought of it, had professionals elaborate on the process - very expensive, very sandy soil requires a liner, and, it needs to get water from somewhere. Plus, rain is not always reliable in this neck of the woods. Heck our house well requires over 4 x fill ups a year to accommodate our family of 5, I can't image the cost of water for the farm, yikes!


Never thought we would miss municipal water. It is a struggle when you cannot grab the hose and water stuff as needed. One of those, you don't know what you've got until it's gone situations.

In all honesty, we don’t want to raise a big stink about it. Some would threaten the media or make hate posts on social platforms to get everyone's panties in a bunch and cause a big uproar to get what they want. But we have no doubt that intentions were there to support us and provide us with water however, after 5 years at this location, these attempts were unsuccessful. We get it; staff changes, hours get cut, ideas were established but nothing got us to where we needed to be. Now we are more behind than ahead. I would say don't stop me now but that would not make sense, financially.

Yes, food grows without water but on a marketing level, water brings in the cha ching cha ching with; transplant sales (transplants need a lot of water!), crop diversity (CSA farms plant multiple successions throughout the year unlike the home garden that plants once or twice), newly seeded beds (germination!), newly planted transplants (sandy soil and hot temps!), AND clean vegetables for the customers (who wants to wash dirty potatoes in their sink at home? not I captain). Water also limits crop failure – we watched 100's and 100’s and 100’s of feet of crops perish. it was very sad. Sound dramatic? It's not. It is extremely disheartening to watch your blood, sweat, tears, and money go down the drain or in this case, shrivel up and die with no chance of being revived. Don’t get me wrong, some crops grew well such as; squash, peas, beans, potatoes, and tomatoes. But this is the crappy market table people walk swiftly by avoiding eye contact. Plus, this lack of variety pisses off CSA members (we don't blame them, they pay big bucks for this service).


We tried. We saved and hauled rain water but when every year is a drought, this is impossible. We planted in the rain until we turned into a raisin from head to toe. We battled the harsh elements of rag weed pollen (allergies! Ack!) and the ticks (which always ended up sucking blood from the hubby because they really love fur). We converted conventional land to be certified organic costing us time and money. Now we are out of patience, support, and money.

Of course, we will continue to operate as a hobby farm. Seed saving and growing food will never die in our history books. In fact, all those backyard gardens friends and family have been showing us for the past 7 years, you have inspired us, we are downscaling!

Anyhow, the water situation plus additional health reasons that required a life style change, we are throwing in the hat! Indefinitely.

It was fun while it lasted! Obla de obla da!!


Come back for updates. We will be here to share the many years of resources and knowledge.


Take care.

"Sharing knowledge is the most fundamental act of friendship. Because it is a way you can give something without losing it." Richard Stallman


Located in Ottawa Ontario's Greenbelt next to the Mer Bleue Bog. The Greenbelt is a protected green space of land that consists of farms, fields, wetlands (the Bog), and forests. It is home to many species of plants, birds, insects and animals. The entire Greenbelt spreads across Ontario and totals over 2 million acres.

The Mer Bleue bog is one of the second largest in Southern Ontario. Because of its valuable impact on climate, it is the most studied Bog in the world (Peatland Carbon Study).

Pest and disease, identification, inputs in reference to Canadian Organic Standards. Biosecurity , environmental planning , food safety. Resources and learning page, contact .

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